Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities
10Apr/140

Henry Ford on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

“Thinking is the hardest work there is, which is probably the reason why so few engage in it.”

-Henry Ford

ford

3Apr/140

Anthony Trollope on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

'Never think that you're not good enough. A man should never think that. People will take you very much at your own reckoning.'

-Anthony Trollope

trollope

27Mar/140

Oscar Wilde on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

'When people agree with me I always feel that I must be wrong.'

-Oscar Wilde

wilde

20Mar/140

Bob Dylan on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

"Gonna change my way of thinking, make myself a different set of rules. Gonna put my good foot forward and stop being influenced by fools."

-Bob Dylan

dylan

19Mar/140

Call for Papers on Justice and law

FromtheArendtCenter

HannahArendt.net,  an online peer reviewed journal has issued a call for papers for their upcoming 'Justice and Law' edition being released in August of this year.

With this topic we wish to participate in current debates insofar as they deal with the juridification of politics as a form of depoliticizing socio-political problems and/or to identify phenomena of dehumanization and exclusion, where  the dual nature of justice and law is overlooked.

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Learn more here, or visit the website here.

13Mar/140

Friedrich Nietzsche on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

'The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently.'

-Friedrich Nietzsche

nietzsche

6Mar/140

Socrates on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

“To find yourself, think for yourself.”

-Socrates

socrates

27Feb/140

Jean-Francois Lyotard on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

“Being prepared to receive what thought is not prepared to think is what deserves the name of thinking.”

- Jean-Francois Lyotard

lyotard

20Feb/140

Albert Camus on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

Thanks to Josetxu V for sending us this thought on thinking.

"Beginning to think is beginning to be undermined. Society has but little connection with such beginnings. The worm is in man´s heart. That is where it must be sought. One must follow and understand this fatal game that leads from lucidity in the face of existence to flight from light."

-Albert Camus

camus

4Feb/140

John F. Kennedy on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

“Too often we... enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought.”

-John F. Kennedy

ken

30Jan/140

Søren Kierkegaard on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

“A man who as a physical being is always turned toward the outside, thinking that his happiness lies outside him, finally turns inward and discovers that the source is within him.”

-Søren Kierkegaard

soren

 

23Jan/140

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

“Thought takes man out of servitude, into freedom.”

-Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

wadsworth

16Jan/140

F. Scott Fitzgerald on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

“Either you think -- or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you.”

-F. Scott Fitzgerald

fitz

9Jan/140

Noam Chomsky on Thinking

Arendtthoughts

"I try to encourage people to think for themselves, to question standard assumptions… Don’t take assumptions for granted. Begin by taking a skeptical attitude toward anything that is conventional wisdom. Make it justify itself. It usually can’t. Be willing to ask questions about what is taken for granted. Try to think things through for yourself.”

-Noam Chomsky

chomsky

23Dec/130

Born into a World of Plurality

Arendtquote

This Quote of the Week was originally posted on August 20, 2012

We are born into this world of plurality where father and mother stand ready for us, ready to receive us and welcome us and guide us and prove that we are not strangers.”

-Hannah Arendt, Denktagebuch
Notebook 19, Section 39, February, 1954

When Rousseau opens Of The Social Contract with the striking phrase "Man is born free andeverywhere he is in chains” he sets up a stark opposition between nature and culture that powers his reconsideration of social bonds. Hannah Arendt also speaks of birth to open the problem of freedom but rather than relegating it to a merely natural state she employs it within a wide variety of narratives, figures of speech, and explanations of novel concepts. Most famously, she employs the term “natality” in The Human Condition to work out a thinking of freedom that offers true interruption and surprise in the face of growing historical and technological automation in the second half of the 20th century. Although Arendt's Thought Diary does not reveal the kind of precise development of natality that would satisfy the demands of scholars of Begriffsgeschichte (the history of concepts), a number of entries refer to birth in a manner that illuminates her later work by establishing sites of concern and questioning.

In the passage above, we see Arendt honing in on the connection between man and world to establish a relation that at first appears surprisingly untroubled to readers of her later work. She describes the mother and father as being there for the child in four ways. In being “ready,” they have prepared for him in advance. They will “receive” him, bringing him to the place that they made. In “welcoming” we might think of additional signs of acceptance that indicate a broader, social incorporation. Further, the parents do not just take in the child at that moment, but offer to “guide” him, accompanying him for a time in the world. The parents do all of this to show that the child belongs, but in Arendt’s repetitions I see an awareness of the difficult amount of work needed in this regard. Moreover, in the “we” of the last line the reader might see not just another reference to the child but to the parents as well. The repeated welcome affirms the place of the parents and child.

The passage above helps us consider society’s response to the newcomer in contrast to Arendt’s idea of “second birth” in which an individual moves beyond the welcome of the world. Now one takes one’s stance in relation to the world by reflecting on the distinction between actual birth and an idea of freedom that emerges from thinking about birth. In chapter 5 of theHuman Condition, Arendt writes: "With word and deed we insert ourselves into the human world, and this insertion is like a second birth, in which we confirm and take upon ourselves the naked fact of our physical appearance." By speaking of insertion, she indicates making room, a gesture of opening a place. In the second birth, one realizes that the plurality of the world does not simply pre-exist but that our own arrival refigures it.

The two kinds of birth that Arendt describes lead us to reflect on the pressures of globalization and the continuing debt crisis in a new light. With the immense weight of previous decisions assigned to them even before they are able to assume a role in society, young people might never reach the stage of feeling that they are “not strangers.” From this starting point, without having a sense of the welcome of the first birth, they may not be able to make the leap through the “like” to the second birth of making a change in the world.

-Jeffrey Champlin